Two U.S. Soldiers Stole Money From Army

The two defendants served as the Finance Officer and Deputy Finance Officer for the U.S. military training mission in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from 2006 to 2007.

As part of their duties in the Finance Office, they had access to a U.S. government bank account that was held at the Saudi American Bank.

In June 2006, the defendants withdrew approximately $1.2 million in cash from the bank account and kept those funds for their own benefit. In August 2006, they made another withdrawal of more than $1.5 million in cash, and again kept the funds for their own use instead of returning the money to the Finance Office.

Falsified finance records

Before leaving Saudi Arabia, both defendants falsely affirmed in Finance Office records that there were no missing funds from the bank account. An audit conducted by the Department of Defense later revealed the theft of funds.

Jasen Minter, 44, of Fayetteville, Georgia, has been sentenced to four years, nine months in prison to be followed by three years of supervised release, and ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $2,216,617.97. Minter was convicted of these charges on November 21, 2014, after he pleaded guilty.

Louis E. Nock, 48, of Orlando, Florida, has been sentenced to four years, nine months in prison to be followed by three years of supervised release. He was also ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $2,216,617.97 to the U.S. Army. Nock was convicted of these charges on January 5, 2015, after he pleaded guilty.

An abuse of trust

“This was an egregious abuse of trust by two former U.S. Army soldiers who had access to millions of dollars of government money,” said Acting U.S. Attorney John Horn. “Their conduct betrayed their trust and honor as service members and took substantial funds away from the U.S. military training mission in Saudi Arabia.”

“Instead of serving their country honorably while stationed overseas in a sensitive assignment, these two U.S. Army finance officers betrayed it by abusing their positions of trust and embezzling more than $2.7 million in American taxpayer funds,” said John F. Khin, a special agent with the Defense Criminal Investigative Service. “This sentencing should serve as a constant reminder that DCIS and our law enforcement partners will relentlessly pursue corruption, fraud, and abuse within Department of Defense programs anywhere in the world, and bring violators to justice.”

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